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The Tristan Times - Tristan da Cunha
The online newspaper of Tristan da Cunha
  Issue No. 566 Online Edition Tuesday 2 September 2014 
Home | Categories | Conservation Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Tristan : A Conservation Project on Nightingale Island
Submitted by Tristan Times (Juanita Brock) 10.01.2005 (Current Article)

Nightingale Island is one of the most important breeding sites for seabirds in the Southern Ocean. The current project will produce a management plan for Nightingale and will implement the practical conservation of the plan.

Photos (c) James Glass (Tristan Times)

A Project "Conservation Management of Nightingale Island" has been Funded by the UK Government 2004-06

 

Yelow Nosed Albatross and chick

 

By James Glass (Tristan Times)

 

Trevor Glass and Jimmy Green using reed cutters to clear a path to the ponds.

 


Nightingale Island is one of the most important breeding sites for seabirds in the Southern Ocean. The current project will produce a management plan for Nightingale and will implement the practical conservation of the plan.

 

Alison Rothwell, Director of the project, with field workers Norman and James Glass and "Cash"  Herbert Glass another field worker, took the photo.

 

Nightingale is the main wildlife site visited by tourists to Tristan da Cunha, and the project aims to maximize the income to Tristan from wildlife tourism. Meanwhile, Conservation are informing and publicising the conservation importance of Nightingale.

 

A seabird monitoring program will be established on Nightingale, which will help to achieve compliance with the Agreement for the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels.  A long-term study of key bird species will be initiated to monitor population trends over the long term.  Also an Education pack for the school will be produced and visitor information and guidelines published. The island will also be cleared of rubbish (building materials, plastics, etc.) that was caused by the Hurricane in May 2001

 

The first field trip to Nightingale Island has been carried out which involved clearing the paths through the 2-3m tussock grass leading from the huts at the landing up to the First Pond, a job which would have taken twice as many islanders twice as long was done in a week, thanks to the purchasing of reed cutters from the UK.

 

The next field trip will involve clearing the New Zealand Flax, which has established itself in and around the first pond, and will cause problems to burrowing birds if left unchecked.  30 Young Albatross chicks will also be ringed in each pond on the nests marked as part of the monitoring project. This trip is due to happen over the next few weeks.

 

Adult bird counts were made of Yellow-nosed Albatrosses nesting in the four ponds/marshes and were as follows:

 

1st Pond  225
2nd Pond  476
3rd Pond  214
4th Pond  106

 

Yellow-nosed Albatrosses are also nesting all over the island.

 

Today the 8th January, the Darwin team cleared the path up Hottentot Gulch and secured some ropes in the difficult places, it is hoped that a field trip can be arranged for the school children to visit the Albatross Colony (2000ft above the village) to watch the Yellow-nosed Albatrosses being ring.  At our last count there were 37 adults in the colony and two Albatrosses have been ringed with satellite trackers on, these will record where they go/feed, and will be taken off their legs when they come in to nest next year.

 

 

 

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